WordPress behind Big-IP

To be honest, I don’t exactly know too much about Big-IP, but I’ve come across someone who use it. They terminate HTTPS in Big-IP and WordPress runs on plain HTTP on port 80 on the backend nodes. By default, this makes WordPress confused, so you can’t login to the WordPress dashboard. Continue reading “WordPress behind Big-IP”

HTTP Public Key Pinning (HPKP)

Using HTTPS helps preventing someone from snooping your username/password or hijacking your sessions. Using HSTS makes sure the connection stays on HTTPS, even if a MITM tries to redirect you to the plain HTTP version of a web site. But it is easier than you might think for a MITM to use a rogue certificate, making you believe everything is fine. HTTP Public Key Pinning (HPKP) helps the browser check that everything actually is fine. Continue reading “HTTP Public Key Pinning (HPKP)”

Using fail2ban from behind a Rackspace Cloud LoadBalancer

If your fail2ban is on a host behind a Rackspace Cloud LoadBalancer, you’ll want to block the offending IP addresses directly in your LoadBalancer. If your LB is acting as a reverse proxy, you’ll HAVE to block in the LB, but it is also nice to protect all other nodes behind the LB and offload the lifting. Continue reading “Using fail2ban from behind a Rackspace Cloud LoadBalancer”

«Slap-on» speed optimization of your WordPress site

OK, so you might have been at a WordCamp listening to talks or reading a few blog posts and you get that you should really get your WordPress site speed optimized. Starting all over isn’t either tempting nor something you have the time for. Don’t despair, you’ll get a long way by installing 5 plugins.
Continue reading “«Slap-on» speed optimization of your WordPress site”

Make Gravity Forms’ JavaScript load in the footer

Gravity Forms is not only THE way to create and manage forms in WordPress, but is also pretty awesome when it comes to extensibility and flexibility. However, as most software, it has its issues. One of those is how it outputs some of the JavaScript, which in certain cases will break your site. This is how to fix it.

Continue reading “Make Gravity Forms’ JavaScript load in the footer”

Securing Nginx with HTTPS

SSLAdding a certificate and using the HTTPS protocol is a good improvement to the security in the communication between the browser and the server, and should be in place on all sites that have a user login. Contrary to what many (older) guides say, it doesn’t add much load on your server and is fairy easy and cheap to set up right. Continue reading “Securing Nginx with HTTPS”

Install latest version of Nginx on Ubuntu

NginxI always run the latest LTS version of Ubuntu on all my servers. Unfortunately, the Nginx versions tend to be quite the bit behind the current release. So how do you get an updated, current version of without resorting to having to maintain the packages yourself? Luckily, the Nginx team have their own Ubuntu apt repository so it’s easy to keep current with the latest version of Nginx. Continue reading “Install latest version of Nginx on Ubuntu”

Install latest version of PHP on Ubuntu

PHPI always run the latest LTS version of Ubuntu on all my servers. Currently the latest LTS is 14.04 which comes with PHP version 5.5, but as of November 2014, the latest stable version is 5.6. So how do you get an updated, current version of PHP without resorting to having to maintain the packages yourself? The answer is in PPA. Continue reading “Install latest version of PHP on Ubuntu”

Publishing WordPress site from development to production server – or moving your WordPress installation from one host to another

WordPressYou have finished that WordPress site, and want to deploy it – move it from your test server to the production server where it goes live. But how? WordPress have a famous 5-minute-install, but there is no 5-minute-go-live-script*. I’ll show you how in these 5 easy-to-follow steps. Continue reading “Publishing WordPress site from development to production server – or moving your WordPress installation from one host to another”

Get your Ubuntu VPS up and running

UbuntuThese are the first steps you should perform on your shiny, brand new VPS to set out on a safe journey on the internets. You don’t actually have to understand each of the steps here, but this post is intented for people who have some clue of what they’re doing. If there is such a thing as a «VPSes for dummies», it should not be read. VPSes are not intended for dummies.

Continue reading “Get your Ubuntu VPS up and running”

Caching: Varnish or Nginx?

TL;DR: Varnish lacks support for SSL and SPDY. Nginx handles it just fine, and has very fast cache with either memcache or disk storage (ramdisk). Both can serve stale cache if your backend is down. But Nginx can not write to the memcache storage directly, it has to be done by the application. Also, Nginx can not purge the cache itself, without you compiling your own package.

Continue reading “Caching: Varnish or Nginx?”